Parent Education

“Keep trying to catch your kid in the act of doing something right. Teens struggle with self-confidence. When they aren’t dumping on themselves, their peers may do it for them. Don’t add your voice to the chorus of negativity. Actively look for things your kids are doing right. Your praise shows you notice more than their faults.” - Annie Fox
 
In light of the tragedies that have occurred recently in our community, and in line with other recent Parent Education posts, we want to introduce a digital platform called BeMe for teens that can provide further coaching and crisis support both asynchronously and in real time. Tech is a large part of our teens’ reality, so this could be one app in their arsenal that could help them through tough times and provide education on self-care.
 
This Tuesday, May 17 at 6pm, AUHSD will lead an important parent webinar on Mental Health & Teens. Click here for the webinar link. Over the last two years in AUHSD, we have seen a rise in the number of students seeking support from our wellness centers. As students have returned to school, anxiety and stress are two factors on the rise. Wellness staff will discuss signs of stress and anxiety and how parents can recognize more serious problems. They will briefly present information on AUHSD’s wellness programs and services available for teens this summer. This webinar will be recorded and posted on the AUHSD website.
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our Wellness Center. Connection and belonging are critical to a teen’s well-being, as well as ours, and will help us all feel more resilient.

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Parent Education

“Keep trying to catch your kid in the act of doing something right.  Teens struggle with self-confidence.  When they aren’t dumping on themselves, their peers may do it for them.  Don’t add your voice to the chorus of negativity.  Actively look for things your kids are doing right.  Your praise shows you notice more than their faults.”  Annie Fox
 
In light of the tragedies that have occurred recently in our community, and in line with other recent Parent Education posts, we want to introduce a digital platform called BeMe for teens that can provide further coaching and crisis support both asynchronously and in real time. Tech is a large part of our teens’ reality, so this could be one app in their arsenal that could help them through tough times and provide education on self-care.
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our Wellness Center. Connection and belonging are critical to a teen’s well-being, as well as ours, and will help us all feel more resilient.

Read more

Parent Education

How many of you have been wondering about your teen’s well-being given the losses we have had in our communities recently? How many of you are anxious and fearful that the same could happen to your child? This is a natural thing to be feeling; you are not alone. 

If you have questions about how to help your teen with grieving and loss, here is a resource from the Center for Loss and another from the Center for Loss and Bereavement. If you are looking for specific language or tips on how to talk with your teen about their loss, consider this resource from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Make sure you validate your teen’s feelings and not dismiss them- this can be difficult to do especially when you feel sad yourself, but it demonstrates empathy.

Contrary to popular belief, talking about suicide with your teens and the reasons why people end their lives does not increase the likelihood that your teen will want to die by suicide. It can open the door for your teen to talk to you about their thoughts and obtain help. People with suicidal thoughts can suffer a range of emotions: sadness, despair, neglect, and anger. Some people who think of suicide may not display any signs. Some potential risk factors may include a break up, struggling with depression or stressful life events, perceived rejection and lack of affirming spaces (e.g. in the LGBTQ+ population), the presence of lethal means in the house, etc. Some possible warning signs for suicide:

  • Talking about death and/or suicide in a casual way
  • Saying they wish they hadn’t been born
  • Asking about death or how to commit violent acts
  • Talking about leaving or going away
  • Saying they won’t need things soon
  • Not wanting to be around people anymore
  • Seeming sad and remote instead of happy and social
  • Becoming more angry or edgy
  • Losing interest in hobbies or events
  • Having trouble focusing
  • Showing changes in normal routine, such as sleeping, eating, or grooming
  • Acting out in harmful ways, such as drinking, using drugs, or hurting themselves
  • Getting in trouble with the law

If you would like more resources on how to talk with your teen about your concerns, an authentic and caring conversation is usually enough. Here is a document from Kidshealth. If you would like to talk with other parents and guardians or need more support, ParentsAnonymous has online parenting support groups as well as a Parent and Youth Helpline: 855-427-2736. An additional resource for teens is from the JED Foundation and their Mental Health Resource Center.  The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is: 1-800-273-8255 or text GO to 741741 to speak to a crisis counselor 24/7.
 
Final thought: please do not forget to take care of yourselves. Just like on airplanes, make sure you put on your face mask first before you put the mask on your child.  Taking care of yourself IS taking care of your kids as your kids will need you as their homebase and touchpoint. Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our Wellness Center.

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Parent Education

How many of you have been wondering about your teen’s well-being given the losses we have had in our communities recently? How many of you are anxious and fearful that the same could happen to your child? This is a natural thing to be feeling; you are not alone. 

If you have questions about how to help your teen with grieving and loss, here is a resource from the Center for Loss and another from the Center for Loss and Bereavement. If you are looking for specific language or tips on how to talk with your teen about their loss, consider this resource from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Make sure you validate your teen’s feelings and not dismiss them- this can be difficult to do especially when you feel sad yourself, but it demonstrates empathy.

Contrary to popular belief, talking about suicide with your teens and the reasons why people end their lives does not increase the likelihood that your teen will want to die by suicide. It can open the door for your teen to talk to you about their thoughts and obtain help. People with suicidal thoughts can suffer a range of emotions: sadness, despair, neglect, and anger. Some people who think of suicide may not display any signs. Some potential risk factors may include a break up, struggling with depression or stressful life events, perceived rejection and lack of affirming spaces (e.g. in the LGBTQ+ population), the presence of lethal means in the house, etc. Some possible warning signs for suicide:

  • Talking about death and/or suicide in a casual way
  • Saying they wish they hadn’t been born
  • Asking about death or how to commit violent acts
  • Talking about leaving or going away
  • Saying they won’t need things soon
  • Not wanting to be around people anymore
  • Seeming sad and remote instead of happy and social
  • Becoming more angry or edgy
  • Losing interest in hobbies or events
  • Having trouble focusing
  • Showing changes in normal routine, such as sleeping, eating, or grooming
  • Acting out in harmful ways, such as drinking, using drugs, or hurting themselves
  • Getting in trouble with the law

If you would like more resources on how to talk with your teen about your concerns, an authentic and caring conversation is usually enough. Here is a document from Kidshealth. If you would like to talk with other parents and guardians or need more support, ParentsAnonymous has online parenting support groups as well as a Parent and Youth Helpline: 855-427-2736. An additional resource for teens is from the JED Foundation and their Mental Health Resource Center.  The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is: 1-800-273-8255 or text GO to 741741 to speak to a crisis counselor 24/7.
 
Final thought: please do not forget to take care of yourselves. Just like on airplanes, make sure you put on your face mask first before you put the mask on your child.  Taking care of yourself IS taking care of your kids as your kids will need you as their homebase and touchpoint. Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our WellnessCenter.

Read more

Parent Education

Don’t be preoccupied with your child’s academic ability, but instead teach them to sit with those sitting alone. Teach them to be kind. Teach them to offer help. Teach them to be a friend to the lonely. Teach them to encourage others. Teach them to think about other people. Teach them to share. Teach them to look for the good. This is how they will change the world. #parentingteensandtweens

Hope you were able to join us for Alternatives to College and College Prep presented by Cindy Muchnick, MA!
 
If you want further guidance about screen time for your teens, here is an article from Common Sense Media that can help!
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our WellnessCenter. Feel free to reach out and connect with us with ideas for future topics, shareable resources, or thoughts at parented@acalanesparentsclub.com.

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Parent Education

It’s okay to let our kids see our humanness. In fact, I think it’s necessary. They should see what it looks like to mess up, apologize, and figure out how to make it right. None of us walk through this life perfectly, and the real lesson is showing our kids what to do next after the mistake. @casey.e.huff
 
Registration is now closed for Start Smart. Hope you were able to register!
 
Thursday, Mar 24 from 6:30 to 7:30pm in the Acalanes Library, Acalanes Parent Ed will host Cynthia Muchnick, M.A., author, speaker, educational consultant, and parent on Alternatives to College and College Prep. As a former Assistant Director of Admissions for the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago, she has extensive experience screening and reviewing thousands of college applications. Most recently, she has authored several books including The Parent Compass: Navigating your Teens Wellness and Academic Journey in Today’s Competitive World and countless articles including Alternatives to College: Exploring Other Routes.Cindy will be speaking in person and available to sign purchased books afterwards.
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our WellnessCenter. Feel free to reach out and connect with us with ideas for future topics, shareable resources, or thoughts at parented@acalanesparentsclub.com.
 

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Parent Education

How to love a big kid - Smile when they walk into a room. Ask their opinion before giving yours. Tell them you believe they can overcome challenges. Apologize when you are wrong. Learn to communicate on their terms too, even if it’s SnapChat. Always keep their favorite snacks on hand. Take any hug you can get. You both need it.
#ParentingTeensandTweens
 
Wednesday, Mar 23 at 6:30 pm in the Miramonte High School Theater Miramonte Parent Ed will host Start Smart, an interactive safe driving class for teens. Attending students will receive a certificate from CHP (California Highway Patrol) to present to their insurance company. Details and registration here.
 
Thursday, Mar 24 from 6:30 to 7:30pm in the Acalanes Library, Acalanes Parent Ed will host Cynthia Muchnick, M.A., author, speaker, educational consultant, and parent on Alternatives to College and College Prep. As a former Assistant Director of Admissions for the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago, she has extensive experience screening and reviewing thousands of college applications. Most recently, she has authored several books including The Parent Compass: Navigating your Teens Wellness and Academic Journey in Today’s Competitive World and countless articles including Alternatives to College: Exploring Other Routes.Cindy will be speaking in person and available to sign purchased books afterwards.
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our WellnessCenter. Feel free to reach out and connect with us with ideas for future topics, shareable resources, or thoughts at parented@acalanesparentsclub.com.

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Parent Education

My teenager is in this “my family doesn’t love me” phase. To flip the script I’ve been hugging and kissing his head. Sulking? I hug and kiss him. Groan, glare, eye roll, I hug and kiss him. And every time, regardless of how irritated he is, he smiles. I think it’s working. - Clint Edwards
 
Wednesday, Mar 23 at 6:30 pm in the Miramonte High School Theater Miramonte Parent Ed will host Start Smart, an interactive safe driving class for teens. Attending students will receive a certificate from CHP (California Highway Patrol) to present to their insurance company. Details and registration here.
 
Thursday, Mar 24 from 6:30 to 7:30pm in the Acalanes Library, Acalanes Parent Ed will host CynthiaMuchnick, M.A., author, speaker, educational consultant, and parent on Alternatives to College and College Prep. As a former Assistant Director of Admissions for the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Chicago, she has extensive experience screening and reviewing thousands of college applications. Most recently, she has authored several books including The Parent Compass: Navigating your Teens Wellness and Academic Journey in Today’s Competitive World and countless articles including Alternatives to College: Exploring Other Routes. Cindy will be speaking in person and available to sign purchased books afterwards.
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our Wellness Center. Feel free to reach out and connect with us with ideas for future topics, shareable resources, or thoughts at parented@acalanesparentsclub.com.

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Parent Education

The way we talk to our children becomes their inner voice- Peggy O’Mara
 
Tomorrow, Monday, Feb 28 at 6:30pm in the Miramonte Library. Miramonte Parent Ed will be hosting a talk on Achievement Pressure: What is it doing to our Kids? Speaker is Bryan Clark, PsyD. Masks will be required.
 
Wednesday, Mar 23 at 6:30 pm at the Miramonte Theater. Miramonte Parent Ed will also be hosting Start Smart, an interactive safe driving class for teens. Attending students will receive a certificate from CHP (California Highway Patrol) to present to their insurance company.
 
Thursday, Mar 24 Acalanes Parent Ed will be hosting Cynthia Muchnick, M.A., author, speaker, and educational consultant on Alternatives to College and College Prep. Cindy will be speaking in person and available to sign purchased books afterwards. More details soon!
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our Wellness Center. Feel free to reach out and connect with us with ideas for future topics, shareable resources, or thoughts at parented@acalanesparentsclub.com.

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Parent Education

Parents say they want kids to be caring, but pay more attention to achievement.  Ironically, kids raised to be kind are more successful in school and work (and happier too).  We shouldn’t just ask kids what they accomplished. We should also ask who they helped-and who helped them. -Adam Grant
 
Monday, Feb 28 at 6:30pm in the Miramonte Library. Miramonte Parent Ed will be hosting a talk on Achievement Pressure: What is it doing to our Kids. Speaker is Bryan Clark, PsyD. Masks will be required.
 
Wednesday, Mar 23 at 6:30 pm at the Miramonte Theater. Miramonte Parent Ed will also be hosting Start Smart, an interactive safe driving class for teens. Attending students will receive a certificate from CHP (California Highway Patrol) to present to their insurance company.
 
Thursday, Mar 24 Acalanes Parent Ed will be hosting Cynthia Muchnick, M.A., author, speaker, and educational consultant on Alternatives to College and College Prep. Cindy will be speaking in person and available to sign purchased books afterwards. More details soon!
 
Finally, if your teen is struggling with academics or feeling down or frustrated about school, don’t forget to connect with our Counselors, our Nurse, and our Wellness Center. Feel free to reach out and connect with us with ideas for future topics, shareable resources, or thoughts at parented@acalanesparentsclub.com.

Read more